Tag: succulents

Pseudolithos migiurtinus, 5 months old

The surface is now even more covered by little bubbles, making the Pseudolithos migiurtinus seedling look like a baby toad. This is the only survivor out of all of my Pseudolithos seedlings, but at least it looks like it’s still doing well. The same thing happened last time I grew these from seeds. One seedling ended up being the stronger one, surviving everything I threw at it. I’m glad the survivor was a P. migiurtinus because now I have two different plants – this one and my 4 year old seed grown P. cubiformis.

This seedling can now handle staying in crispy dry soil for a while. I kind of forget about it and only water once a week when the soil has been dry for at least 4-5 days. Right now the weather is chilly and mostly cloudy, so the seedling should be able to handle staying dry for even longer than that.

Astrophytum coahuilense x ornatum, 1 month old

My Astrophytum CO x OR seedlings are very much still alive. Most of the seedlings have now developed little fluffy haircuts and short, white spines. The grow lights are doing their job keeping the seedlings from etiolating. I may have placed them a little bit too close to the lights because some of them are a tiny bit too red or brown. I’ve lost exactly 0 seedlings so far, so I think the lighting situation is going to be okay.

Adenium obesum, 5 months old (and update on the A. arabicum)

My Adenium obesum seedlings are now 5 months old and look like little trees! They’re doing awesome right now, rocking their new branches like pros. Look how fat they’ve gotten too.
I included a picture of my adult Adenium arabicum, which is doing great as well. I had to loosen its korok mask a couple of times since I put it on him, which is a good sign that it’s growing, even though it’s hard to see when you just look at it.

About half of my Hoya collection in my living room window

This may seem excessive. It kind of is, too. When you don’t have curtains, an excessive amount of plants works too. I mean, what else am I going to place in a window other than plants?
Hoyas love a good amount of sunlight, even strong light from a south facing window, like this one. A new plant, or one that was previously used to less light, may need some time to get used to it, but I’ve found that the plants in this window grow much faster and bloom more often than the plants I’ve placed in partial shade.

I took a couple of pictures of my Hoya compacta variegata – one with the vines tucked away, like they usually are, and one where I let the vines grow freely. I measured both of them to be 90 cm long. Almost 30 cm longer than they were 3 months ago. I lost my normal green compacta to root mealy bugs a couple of months ago. If I lose this variegated plant, I would probably cry.

When to water a Lapidaria

Lapidaria margaretae are getting more popular, which is awesome. They’re a good challenge, especially if you haven’t owned one before. I wrote a guide a while back to show you how I raise mine, but of course I forgot to show you what a Lapidaria looks like when it needs water. For a loving plant mom/dad it’s hard to look at a plant for months without watering it. Lapidaria need very little water. I water mine every 4 months (± 1 month) and only when it wrinkles up like in the first picture. If you water when it’s plump, the leaves will crack open, which will ruin the nice and clean marshmallow-like appearance.
Remember to keep a Lapidaria in a small pot to make sure the soil dries out as fast as possible. I keep my plant in a tiny 3 cm terra-cotta pot with pure diatomaceous earth (cat litter).

This is basically how I’ve been taking care of my Lapidaria since I bought it in October 2015.

You know you love your plant when..

… you spend 2 hours at night after a long day of work unraveling the vines of a Hoya to try and change the trellis. My Hoya Krimson Queen was too heavy for the simple, round wire trellis and the plant was starting to lean to one side. There wasn’t enough room for the vines and leaves to grow without problems, either. The innermost leaves were warped out of shape from getting stuck in tight spaces and the vines were strangling themselves as they grew larger.
Time to save this big boy.
A pyramid shaped trellis works better for larger plants with more weight to them. Luckily I had a spare one after slaughtering my Hoya australis (starting over from cuttings because of root problems).
This new setup works much better! Now every leaf gets sunlight and there’s room for even more growth.

The Sulcorebutia rauschii exploded with growth

Maybe it was the new pot or maybe it happened because I started to fertilize. But the Sulcorebutia rauschii exploded with growth in spring and especially here in summer.
I love this one because of its color and because they grow in big clusters, filling out the entire pot in no time. A couple of years ago I saw one in a garden center labeled as “rare cactus”. The cluster was just about the size of mine and it cost DKK 300 ($40). I bought mine as a mini-plant with only one head for DKK 25 ($3) in 2017. I’m glad I didn’t buy it back when I first saw it.

My Hoya retusa is doing great!

I didn’t actually think the Hoya retusa I bought was going to survive. When I bought it, the leaves were shriveling up and the vines looked like they were going to dry out. I repotted it, changed the soil and gave it light from my south facing window and it sprung to life! Now the vines are attaching themselves to everything they can grab, including the sting I used to hang it up.

I keep forgetting to water this Hoya, so the soil is bone dry for maybe a week or two before I water again. I guess this one can handle that. It’s thriving on neglect.

It’s happening! My seed grown Euphorbia obesa is blooming!

I think I induced blooming on my 4 year old Euphorbia obesa by fixing its roots a month ago. The feeder roots had completely disappeared, so I dipped the bare tap root in rooting hormone gel. I kept watering, but left it alone without checking if the roots grew back.
I think the plant is doing well. Only a couple of weeks after the treatment, I saw little flower buds appear on the newest growth!
These are my Euphorbia obesas first ever flowers. They’re tiny and not completely developed yet. I’ll make sure to post again when the rest of the buds bloom.
You can tell from the shape of the flowers that this plant is female.