Tag: seedlings

Mammillaria plumosa, 3,5 years old

These seed grown 3,5 years old Mammillaria plumosa are now bigger than my hand. They’re currently staying in a 15 cm pot, but it won’t be long before they need an even bigger pot. This is the fastest growing cactus I have ever grown from seeds. There are actually two plants in there. The big bulb on the second picture (top right near the white string hanging from the wall) is the brother of the big mass that turned out to be the faster growing seedling.
I wonder how big this plant is going to get.

Faucaria tigrina, 4,5 years old

These seed grown Faucaria tigrina have almost outgrown their pot. They have all developed a little stem and are hanging over the edge, but I kind of like the look of them. Faucaria tigrina are mesembs, but unlike Lithops, Pleiospilos and conophytum, Faucaria can handle more water and are allowed to develop several leaf sets. They’re slightly faster growing, too. Mine spend all of their time “outdoors” on my frost protected balcony, even in winter.

To be honest, I haven’t really been thinking much about them for the last couple of years. I wonder why they’re still alive when store-bought Faucarias die almost immediately after I buy them. I water when they look slightly wrinkly, but leave them in direct sun, so the soil dries out almost immediately. They have experienced scorching direct sunlight, cold and humid winters, me forgetting to water for months, staying in the same pot without a change of soil for more than 4 years and a few rounds of spider mites and they’re still here.

Selenicereus grandiflorus babies!

I found these seed packets with Stapelia gigantea and Selenicereus grandiflorus a month ago and decided to give it a try. I don’t think the Stapelia seeds will germinate, because I couldn’t keep the seeds from being overtaken by black mold, even after a good hydrogen peroxide soak. The Selenicereus grandiflorus are doing okay right now. A month after germination, a couple of them have grown these little spikes and they’re adorable!
Selenicereus grandiflorus are known for their huge, beautiful flowers, but the plants themselves can be kind of bland. This is why I love cacti, though. They can blend in with the background, sometimes even be downright ugly for years, but when they finally decide to bloom, they’re magnificent. Even if the flower only lasts for one day.

Astrophytum coahuilense x ornatum, 2 months old

Look how adorable my little CO x OR hybrids are today! They’re like little fluffy stars.

I recently took them out of the little greenhouse, I kept them in. Some of the old seed shells started to grow some sort of white fungus, which would have killed the nearby seedlings very quickly if I hadn’t removed the top of the greenhouse. Astrophytum seedlings are notorious for dying from damping off, so maybe it was about time I introduced them to lower humidity.

Right now I keep the soil from drying out by watering a couple of times a week. They’re still under grow lights and probably will be until next spring. They’re still way too small to experience the late summer sun.

Adenium obesum, 5 months + 20 days old

I had to cut some of the Adenium seedlings again to make them grow more than the one branch. This seedling had to be pinched twice before it finally happened.

The trunk is nice and thick now, but they’re not growing as fast as I wanted them to do. They’re cute, though. Maybe the last few days of heavy sunshine and extremely warm weather will make them grow a bit faster.

Pseudolithos migiurtinus, 5 months old

The surface is now even more covered by little bubbles, making the Pseudolithos migiurtinus seedling look like a baby toad. This is the only survivor out of all of my Pseudolithos seedlings, but at least it looks like it’s still doing well. The same thing happened last time I grew these from seeds. One seedling ended up being the stronger one, surviving everything I threw at it. I’m glad the survivor was a P. migiurtinus because now I have two different plants – this one and my 4 year old seed grown P. cubiformis.

This seedling can now handle staying in crispy dry soil for a while. I kind of forget about it and only water once a week when the soil has been dry for at least 4-5 days. Right now the weather is chilly and mostly cloudy, so the seedling should be able to handle staying dry for even longer than that.