Tag: pilea

Pilea peperomioides

My Pilea peperomioides in its new pot. I had to change the pot after realizing that the roots had no space to grow in the 23 cm pot it was in previously. They started to grow out of the drainage hole and on the surface of the soil. The soil itself dried out way too quickly, even after a deep watering. Now it’s hopefully in its forever-pot. This was the biggest terra-cotta pot I could find that matched the ones my succulents grow in. It’s 30 cm in diameter and takes up so much space, but I really want this Pilea to do well!

Pilea peperomioides

A lot has happened since the last update on my Pilea peperomioides. The biggest stem is now 30 cm tall and the leaves have turned a much healthier green. 4 months ago it was the size of the smaller Pilea by my TV and the leaves were yellowish green.

At the moment I fertilize a couple of times a month. Fertilizing has helped the plant green up a bit after a long winter. I moved the plant closer to my south facing window as well. It still doesn’t get much (if any) direct sunlight, but the change has been enough to cause some leaves to curl up from stress. Usually they straighten out once the plant gets used to its new position.

Pilea care guide

My biggest Pilea is doing exceptionally well at the moment. It’s growing very quickly and keeps sending out pups, making it the most decorative plant in my apartment. The stem itself is 25 cm tall right now.

I noticed that the guys I gave my pups to didn’t know how to take care of a Pilea, so I made a little guide on how to not kill them:

Watering: Keep your Pilea evenly moist, letting the soil dry slightly between watering. The leaves start to droop if they’re desperate for water.

Pots: Pileas grow very quickly and need to be repotted once they outgrow the one they’re in. When you notice that the soil dries out way too quickly, it’s time for a repot. The pot needs to be about an inch larger than the last. I use terra-cotta, but plastic pots are fine. Just make sure there’s a drainage hole in the bottom of the pot.

Soil: Potting soil with a bit of grit (perlite, pumice or tree bark) is fine.

Light: Don’t place your plant in direct sunlight, but not in darkness either. Indirect sun only. A north or east facing window (northern hemisphere) is okay. Or you can place them further back in the room if you only have south facing windows, like I did.

Pups: Pileas pup. They pup a lot. My mother plant produced around 30 pups in its lifetime. I kept one (the one in the picture), which produced another 30 pups. They root very easily and most basal pups already have roots when you remove them. If not, take a clean knife and cut the stem below the soil line. I usually place mine in a 5 cm plastic pot with moist soil immediately after removing it. The leaves start to perk up when they have developed roots about a week or two later.

Pilea update

There’s always a bit of history with Pileas and the metric ton of pups, they produce. If you own one of these, you’re almost obligated to share a cutting or 30 with friends, family and neighbors.

I got this plant as a smallish cutting 3 years ago from my mom. Since then it has produced around 60 little pups. I wonder how many grandchildren and great grandchildren it has now.