Tag: hoya

About half of my Hoya collection in my living room window

This may seem excessive. It kind of is, too. When you don’t have curtains, an excessive amount of plants works too. I mean, what else am I going to place in a window other than plants?
Hoyas love a good amount of sunlight, even strong light from a south facing window, like this one. A new plant, or one that was previously used to less light, may need some time to get used to it, but I’ve found that the plants in this window grow much faster and bloom more often than the plants I’ve placed in partial shade.

I took a couple of pictures of my Hoya compacta variegata – one with the vines tucked away, like they usually are, and one where I let the vines grow freely. I measured both of them to be 90 cm long. Almost 30 cm longer than they were 3 months ago. I lost my normal green compacta to root mealy bugs a couple of months ago. If I lose this variegated plant, I would probably cry.

You know you love your plant when..

… you spend 2 hours at night after a long day of work unraveling the vines of a Hoya to try and change the trellis. My Hoya Krimson Queen was too heavy for the simple, round wire trellis and the plant was starting to lean to one side. There wasn’t enough room for the vines and leaves to grow without problems, either. The innermost leaves were warped out of shape from getting stuck in tight spaces and the vines were strangling themselves as they grew larger.
Time to save this big boy.
A pyramid shaped trellis works better for larger plants with more weight to them. Luckily I had a spare one after slaughtering my Hoya australis (starting over from cuttings because of root problems).
This new setup works much better! Now every leaf gets sunlight and there’s room for even more growth.

Hoya flowers on a rainy day

This week is going to be rainy and windy with pretty much no chance of sun. My Hoyas gave me something nice to look at, now that I can’t go outside on my walks – 2 huge flower umbels on my Hoya carnosa “krimson queen”, 3 umbels on my Hoya cumingiana and 5 on my Hoya bella. When I wake up in the morning, my living room smells like all sorts of candy mixed together.
The cumingiana and bella have both been blooming constantly for the last couple of months, developing new peduncles as the old ones fall off.

Plant haul

I was just looking for a small, hanging Monstera adansonii, but ended up with three gorgeous plants. From left to right: a hybrid Caladium bicolor, Monstera adansonii ‘Monkey Mask’ and a Hoya ‘Lisa’.
At least I found what I was looking for, right?
I’ve never grown Caladium before, so this will be a bit of a challenge. Caladium bulbs send out these colorful leaves every spring and summer and die off in fall. Then you never know if you killed it or if the bulb just went dormant. When repotting this plant, I found multiple bulbs in the soil. I’ve seen one bulb sold for DKK 300 ($40) in several stores and online. I bought 4 bulbs for DKK 70 ($9), so this rainy day just got a lot more colorful!

My Hoya retusa is doing great!

I didn’t actually think the Hoya retusa I bought was going to survive. When I bought it, the leaves were shriveling up and the vines looked like they were going to dry out. I repotted it, changed the soil and gave it light from my south facing window and it sprung to life! Now the vines are attaching themselves to everything they can grab, including the sting I used to hang it up.

I keep forgetting to water this Hoya, so the soil is bone dry for maybe a week or two before I water again. I guess this one can handle that. It’s thriving on neglect.

Hoya kerrii update

It hasn’t been that long since I took a picture of my Hoya kerrii. I last wrote about it in May. I just wanted to show you what suddenly happened 3 weeks ago. The vines actually started growing – and they’re growing fast! I’m making a makeshift trellis out of flower sticks because the vines don’t bend without breaking. This must mean that I finally found the one spot in my apartment that is bright enough, have enough humidity and is warm enough for this fussy plant. Unfortunately this spot is in my “nursery room” for sick plants, which is a room, I rarely spend time in. It’s too dark for my camera, too, so I had to move it into my living room for this shot.

I found my macro lens

I reanimated my old iPhone 6 just to take these photos with the macro lens I bought specifically for this phone, so the quality of these images isn’t great. I just wanted to see my Hoya flowers up close. The Hoya cumingiana photo turned out pretty well, I think. They look like little shooting stars.

I set my Hoya cumingiana free

I was having problems with the round trellis for my Hoya cumingiana because the vines are too stiff to properly wrap around the metal wire. It looked like a hot mess, so I carefully removed the trellis and let all of the vines hang loose. I had no idea how long the vines were! When I stretch them out, they can reach the bottom of my window sill, hanging from the top of the window.
The plant doesn’t look like it suffered too much from being unwrapped, but it did lose a few leaves here and there. The almost naked parts of the vines is the result of a couple of spider mite infestations. Luckily, I haven’t seen any spider mites since fall.

Now it’s easier to appreciate the flowers, too!