Tag: caudiciforms

Adenium obesum, 6 weeks old

My Adenium seedlings have so many leaves now! They started to grow really fast when I put them in my window with strong sunlight. They seem to be able to handle the sun and heat, even though they’re still pretty young.
I’m currently keeping the “soil“ lightly moist at all times. I’ve fertilized once already, using a weak slow release fertilizer for young plants.

Adenium obesum, 2 weeks old

The Adenium obesum seedlings are now 2 weeks old. 6 seedlings have sprouted so far. Two of the seeds ended up having some sort of mold on them and unfortunately they died off before they germinated.

I have now moved them from the grow lights to my south facing window to avoid any etiolation. I want fat little seedlings, not lanky ones.

Adenium obesum germination

The Adenium obesum “double flower hybrid” have started to germinate, too! Things are taking their time in my little mini greenhouse. Only one seedling has popped up so far, 1,5 weeks after the seeds were sown.
But look how adorable it is! I think I accidentally made it look a bit wonky by planting the seed vertically instead of horizontally. The roots came out the top of the seed and it had to turn 180 degrees to reach the soil, which resulted in a bent stem. It’s currently correcting itself by growing towards the grow lights.

Ibervillea lindheimeri, 3 years old!

Look at those locks! My now 3 year old Ibervillea looks amazing and thicc. It had a bit of a gnat problem a couple of weeks ago. Apparently they like the smell of the caudex and love crawling all over it. Killing the little gnat larvae in the soil is easy enough when you allow it to dry for a few weeks. Ibervillea like to stay dry, like most other succulents. Had it happened to one of my other water-loving plants, it would have been an impossible task.

The Trochomeria and Ibervillea are together at last

There was no room for my Ibervillea on the window sill with my other succulents, so as a last resort I had to move it somewhere else and let it roam free. My Trochomeria macrocarpa (left) and Ibervillea lindheimeri (right) grew up together when they were seedlings and only met each other again, barely 2 years later. They’re both 2 years and 8 months old here. The Trochomeria is so happy to be where it is, that it decided to flower for the second time this year, too.

Look how awesome they look next to each other, hiding my embarrassing DVD collection away with their fast growing vines.

Trochomeria macrocarpa, 2 years + 7 months

My Trochomeria macrocarpa hasn’t gotten much attention at all compared to my Ibervillea. They were practically brothers and even germinated on the same grow rack right next to each other. I completely forget about it and it ends up staying bone dry for weeks until I water again. Luckily, caudiciforms can handle that kind of treatment because of their large caudex, in which they store water for dry seasons and forgetful plant moms. My forgetfulness hasn’t prevented it from thriving and putting on a show with lots of new growth.

Ibervillea lindheimeri, 2 years + 8 months

The Ibervillea woke up immediately after I decided to bring it indoors again. Even though all of its leaves fell off while it was outdoors, I didn’t cut off the bare vine. It’s now very quickly growing leaves from every node on the vine, attaching itself to everything, including my other succulents. Every day I have to save at least one succulent from becoming the Ibervillea’s new trellis. Maybe this wasn’t the best place to put it..